The World of Tomorrow: 1939 New York World’s Fair

From the official 1939 New York World’s Fair pamphlet:

The eyes of the Fair are on the future — not in the sense of peering toward the unknown nor attempting to foretell the events of tomorrow and the shape of things to come, but in the sense of presenting a new and clearer view of today in preparation for tomorrow; a view of the forces and ideas that prevail as well as the machines.

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Agent Carter

Agent Carter

Agent Carter is one of Marvel’s recent additions to their cinematic universe. Peggy Carter was first introduced in Captain America: The First Avenger, not only as Captain Roger’s love interest but as a lady of flawless class, style and competence. It’s no surprise the character became loved enough to earn her own TV series.

The time is 1946 and things have radically changed for Peggy. Where she was a valued part of anti-Hydra and -Nazi actions during World War II, she is now the sole female field agent of the Strategic Scientific Reserve — and grossly overlooked by her male co-workers.

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The Rocketeer and The Spirit: Pulp Friction

The Rocketeer and The Spirit: Pulp Friction

The Rocketeer returns from the presses of IDW Publishing with an all-new adventure. This time he’s not alone but teams up with that other beloved dieselpunk pulp hero: Will Eisner’s The Spirit.

Which is great news for fans of both heroes, as this particular crossover is pretty brilliant.

Even though it combines two very different settings, the author and artists do a fantastic job representing both and combining these worlds in a realistic fashion that does the two of them justice.

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Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror

Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror

It’s the fourth installment of IDW Publishing’s revamped Rocketeer series already and, to be honest, I’m still not sure where they’re taking it. I’m not even sure I like what they’re doing to the much beloved pulp superhero.

It’s not so much the fact that every story they change writers and artists that irks me. There is a lot of talent out there and it’s great that different people get a stab at The Rocketeer. As long as they’re competent storytellers and make excellent art, I’m fine with it.

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Flapper: A Madcap Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity and the Women Who Made America Modern

Flapper cover

Occasionally a book comes along that is a must-have for the library of any dieselpunk. Joshua Zeitz’ Flapper: A Madcap Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity, and the Women Who Made America Modern is one of those books.

Beginning with the court case of Eugenia Kelly in 1915, Zeitz takes the reader on a wild journey of personalities, history and socio-economic forces to show the amazing rise and fall of the flapper phenomenon of the 1920s. While this may sound dry, it’s anything but. Zeitz’ writing is enthralling and holds the reader from front to back. In Flapper, he paints a dynamic picture that’s captivating in its presentation.

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Airships: True Liners of the Skies

Although airships are popular in steampunk, their heydays came during the era that is more typically associated with dieselpunk. They shared the skies with that other novelty, the aeroplane. The two coexist elegantly in Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow (2004).

Planes represent adventure and perhaps a tad of recklessness. Airships exhale confidence and grandeur. They represent an era that was characterized by progress and great confidence in it.

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Rocketeer: Cargo of Doom

Rocketeer: Cargo of Doom

The third installment in the new Rocketeer series brings back the Rocketeer we have come to know and love. No more chronologically jumbled-up short stories by different artists and authors, but an all-new adventure written by Mark Waid with art by Chris Samnee, who previously participated in the first Rocketeer Adventures.

Originally a four-part comic story, this is the hardcover compilation of the “Cargo of Doom” story arc, which was previously released as a four-part comic adventure by IDW Publishing. Extras include 36 pages of storyboard sketches and art.

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Rocketeer Adventures, Volume 2

Rocketeer Adventures

Where the first volume had only the small downside of lack of chronology, volume 2 of the Rocketeer Adventures sadly does not live up to expectations.

There are a few beautifully drawn and strong stories in there, but overall it lacks the beauty and storytelling of the first release.

The lack of chronology has become downright annoying, as now you have short stories that are jumbled over two volumes time-wise, which is just bothersome. And in some cases the art is so subpar that the story can’t make up for it.

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Rocketeer Adventures

Rocketeer Adventures

Long after the unfortunate and untimely demise of the Rocketeer’s creator, Dave Stevens (1955-2008), his creation is back, resurrected by some of the sharpest talents in today’s comic-book business. Since then sixteen new volumes have been released, forming three all-new series.

It’s about the first of these, Rocketeer Adventures, I would like to talk in our last review of 2012.

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