help needed: Weird War/occult Dieselp. books?

edited February 2010 in Diesel
Ok, I'm a great fan of all this weird war stuff found in some Dieselpunk related movies and comics.

You know - germans (or any other nation but they are best suited I guess ;) ) trying to gain world domination by using occult and esoteric forces like in Hellboy, in the Indy movies, Captain Gravity, Life Eaters & War Of the Undead comics etc.pp.
With the preferred setting of WW1 or WW2

I don't know that many books and comics dealing with this themes, so maybe some people here can help me out with some recommendations which books and comics I should have to look out for.
The more "fantasy/occult" stuff included - the better (Hellboy has just the right mix, e.g.)

Here's a list of the few stuff I already know.
Books:
The Bloody Red Baron (man, I LOVE this book!!!)
The Judas Cross
The Spear
Devils of D-Day
They Used Dark Forces
some stuff of "G8 and his Battle Aces"

Comics:
Cpt. Gravity
Hellboy & BPRD
The Rocketeer
War of the Undead
The Life-Eaters

I guesss (and hope) there are tons more of this stuff to be found.
Any ideas? :)

Comments

  • You seem to have listed pretty much all the titles I know from memory.
  • :| too bad... I had though there must be many, many more...
  • Oh, I'm sure there must be lots more pulp stories of this kind around.

    One suggestion I can offer though: The Nameless Nazi
  • Not a story in itself, but has a few small entrees of speculation, the book 'My Tank Is Fight' records many strange and unusual weapons from the second world war, with small extracts written in a pulp-style on how they may have been had they been deployed. It includes the monstrous tanks, U-cruiser, personal helicopter backpacks and so on. Rather good.
  • "My Tank is Fight" is already in my bookshelf ;) (the name "Maus" for that behemoth is chosen perfectly :D )But I'm going to check out the link mentioned by Ottens later the day.
    Thanks.
  • Well, I think you hit the seminal works on the subject. You would think the occult angles (whether from inside the Reich or those battling) would be deep waters for writers to fish from (considering the current Emo vampire craze as an example.)

    But I digress.

    I can think of a few off the top of my head (and Amazon.uk) like a new book called Sisterhood of the Rose by Jim Marrs, Midnight Guardian by Sara Jane Stratford and Atomic Robo as well.

    And a shameless plug for my own book Tales of the First Occult War. :)
  • NOVELS:
    Aside from 'Devils of D-Day', Masterton also wrote a horror novel called 'Tengu' which is pretty decent stuff. You've mentioned one of Wheatley's 'Gregory Sallust' novels, all of which contain the occult and many of which are set during the war. Then there is a series of novels by David Bishop called 'Fiends of the Eastern Front' about vampires (also a novel about Japanese vampires and a comic book on which the novels were based).

    COMICS:
    I'm damned if I can remember the name but there was a fairly recent comic featuring angels and the Spear of Destiny. Lots of old British war comics had elements of the weird: human torpedos, Nazi robots at the North Pole, armoured fighting frames, huge bombardment cannons, super-sniper rifles etc. But they're incredibly difficult to find and very badly documented so I can't really point you in any directions. There's '30 Day of Night: Red Snow' about vampires on the Eastern Front, though not everyone likes Ben Templesmith's art style. If you're looking for retro there's the old US series 'The Haunted Tank' about...a haunted tank. Grant Morrison's 'Zenith' is set in the 1980's but has a flashback to the 1940's when Britain's superhero fought Germany's. Alan Moore's 'Top 10: The Forty Niner's' is about superheroes returning home from WW2. Then there is another comic called 'The Lost Squad' which features occultists, spider tanks and so on. Its fairly harmless fun.

    AUDIO:
    There are also radio dramas. I can think of two, both BBC. 'The Scarifiers' is technically set in the late 1930's but features British occult detectives, secret RAF projects and horrors from beyond the stars. There was another series called 'Slipstream' about a British Commando team hunting a Nazi flying saucer. Neither is brilliant but they're both fairly fun and worth a listen. There is also 'The Quatermass Memoirs' which is a mix of drama and interview with Nigel Kneale who created the Quatermass TV dramas that, whilst set just after WW2, are excellent, very close to the period and are full of interesting material (I can't recommend them enough!)

    There are more, plenty more, but I'll have to rack my brains to remember them all. Hope this helps for now.
  • edited February 2010
    And a shameless plug for my own book Tales of the First Occult War. :)
    no need to be ashamed - sounds exactly like what I'm looking for. Is it available also on amazon Germany? Or could I maybe order it directly by you?

    @xeoran:
    Thanks for the detailled reply :)
    I remember seeing "Red Snow" at my local comic dealer but I had completely forgotten about it till your post. So thanks for that. Also "The Lost Squad" I already have seen somewhere ina shelf at the store. Going to check that again. Sounds cool!
    When back home I'm going to check out all the other stuff you (and the others) mentioned.
    And please - keep your brain rotating until you remember the comic's name you mentioned (the one with the Spear). THAT sounds great! :D

    edit:
    if any german people here on the forum are reading this - if you're looking for a fantastic audioplay with such a theme, look out for the series "Die Schwarze Sonne"
    http://www.die-schwarze-sonne.de/
    A haunting series spanning from the 19th century over to the present time and incorporating lovecraftian stuff as well as the mentioned occult WW2 issues. The story is told with three timelines all having to do with the greater plot. Absolutely brilliant speakers, good music etc.
  • Ah Beauregard, I would be more than glad to send an e-Book (PDF) copy of "Tales of the First Occult War" for gratis.

    Ditto for any other Gatehouse members in good standing, just let me know.
  • Great! Thanks. Saw your mail and replied ;)
  • Ah Beauregard, I would be more than glad to send an e-Book (PDF) copy of "Tales of the First Occult War" for gratis.

    Ditto for any other Gatehouse members in good standing, just let me know.
    I'd love a copy, Sir, if you'd be so kind!
    xeoran wrote:
    Grant Morrison's 'Zenith' is set in the 1980's but has a flashback to the 1940's when Britain's superhero fought Germany's.
    I loved Zenith - for those not in the know, think Watchmen set in the UK at the end of the 20th Century. Also out at the same time in one of 2000AD's sister publications, and linked to it, was The New Statesmen, set in the USA.
  • My only problem with Zenith was that like so much 1980's literature it was so rabidly anti-Thatcher. Which just made it feel tired simply because one read so many anti-Thatcherite screeds that it got on the nerves. Otherwise it was hugely enjoyable, one of 2000AD's best.
  • Ah Beauregard, I would be more than glad to send an e-Book (PDF) copy of "Tales of the First Occult War" for gratis.
    Though I'm currently reading a book, I couldn't wait and started reading the pdf a bit. So far I finished the first two stories.
    "Crete" is great. Due to the island invasion theme is gets a form "Navarone meets Occult" touch (I love that one!!!). And you did a great job in describing the the main character Gio. I will have to be finishing the other book I'm reading now to then read the pdf completely! :)
    Thanks again!
  • Beauregard wrote:
    "Crete" is great. Due to the island invasion theme is gets a form "Navarone meets Occult" touch (I love that one!!!). And you did a great job in describing the the main character Gio. I will have to be finishing the other book I'm reading now to then read the pdf completely! :)
    Thanks again!
    Beauregard, thanks so much for diving right in. I am glad you enjoyed the Crete story. As always, keep up the reading and I am eager to hear what your overall impressions will be. Thanks for reading!
  • @redfezwriter:
    btw - where is the cover art (seen on amazon) taken from?

    oh, and feedback is the minimum I can give you back for giving out the pdf ;)
  • Beauregard wrote:
    @redfezwriter:
    btw - where is the cover art (seen on amazon) taken from?

    oh, and feedback is the minimum I can give you back for giving out the pdf ;)
    The Amazon cover is from a Nazi-era anti-Soviet propaganda poster.
  • edited March 2010
    I finished your book yesterday, redfezwriter. Once again thank you very much for sending it to me. Overall it was just nearly exactly what stories I love to read.
    You have a very, hmmm... how to say...?, illustrative way of writing and the stories directly were somewhat visible in my imaginery.

    Further I highly enjoyed that you weaved many different aspects of mythology into the stories and didn't just took "standard" approaches (in terms of: germans sticking only to norse myths, e.g.).

    Besides the already mentioned "Crete", my fave stories were:
    "Lemnos" with the cool idea of Hephaestus' automatons (oh, and I, too, am using Sebottendorf as a character in the novel I'm writing on since Nov. 2008, hehe - a person with great "fictional potential").

    and

    "Palestine". With the QNG you have created something with a lot of further potential in my opinion. I can see comics or even animated series showing the missions of the QNG! besides that the overall story was just great and finely crafted!

    Also the basic ideas behind the "London" and "Los Angeles" stories were very cool.

    Those I didn't like so much (but they were still at least quite good) were "Brcko" and "Moscow". "Brcko" wasn't somewhat deep enough imo and regarding "Moscow" - I personally am just a bit tired of the whole "undead" thing ;-)
    Oh, but I loved the appearance of P38 Lightnings in Brcko - my fave fighting aeroplane ;)

    So, I hope you are going to write a lot more and maybe even a "full" novel. Palestine for instance offers great possibilities of becoming a "full length" (again - imo...)
  • Beauregard wrote:
    I finished your book yesterday, redfezwriter. Once again thank you very much for sending it to me. Overall it was just nearly exactly what stories I love to read.
    You have a very, hmmm... how to say...?, illustrative way of writing and the stories directly were somewhat visible in my imaginery.
    I can only bow with the deepest appreciation and thanks. Thank you very much for the feedback, thoughts and comments. I am humbled.

    As for the QNG....stay tuned, they will be breaking out on their own very, very soon.
  • Not sure if these would fit into what you are looking for.

    Lamas Night, by Kathy Kurtz.
    It deals with British occult groups attempting to create a cone of protection over the British Isles. The reasoning behind it is that the German High Command may attempt to use occult methods to boost the efforts of the London bombings.

    Pulp Heroes: More Than Mortal. Not really an occult novel. It's more of a pastiche pulp novel where the author's versions of Doc Savage, The Spider, The Shadow, and, The Avenger, must unite to fight off the author's version of The Red Skull.
    IMO, the best pulp pastiche ever written.
  • @Steve:
    Hey, thanks. Both (esp. the first one) sound exactly like my cup of dark, weird tea ;)
    Going to put them on my books-to-buy list right away!
  • edited March 2010
    Glad to be of help.
    A somewhat different take on what your looking for can be found in Paul Wilson's The Keep.
    A unit of SS is sent to route out resistance in Romania and sets their headquarters is an old, wait for it, keep.
    Through their own stupidity they release the being that has been held there for a very very long time.
    And no, it is not a vampire. It is something worse.
  • As chance would have it, many years ago I was working for a brief time at Shepperton Studios. They were shooting The Keep there at that time. The movie wasn't much but in those pre-CG days it was great fun to see the enormous sets and amazing props. One whole soundstage was dressed with faux rock up the walls to stand in for a huge cavern or "keep" carved out of the interior of a mountain. Also there were dozens of mannequins of blasted dead Nazis. They are horrifying when seen in context of the movie, but when they were just standing around out in the bright sunshine all day waiting for their scene, they were pretty funny.
  • There's a Wierd War 2 Tabletop RPG by Pinnacle books. Might be worth some ideas...
  • I don't know whether it's been said before or not, but "Diesel City" by Stefan is one of the quintessential Diesel works :)
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