The Normandie

SS Normandie was a French ocean liner built in Saint-Nazaire France for Compagnie Générale Transatlantique. When launched in 1932 she was the largest and fastest ship in the world, and she maintains the distinction of being the most powerful steam turbo-electric propelled passenger ship ever built. Her novel design features and lavish interiors have led many to consider her the greatest of all ocean liners.

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Comments

  • Found two more websites about this ship:

    This page, in French, has a nice collection of photographs (near bottom of page).

    normandiequeenmarynh1.jpg
    The Normandie (far left) along the Queen Mary and a third, unidentified ship.

    Normandie: A Photographic Portrait (click image to enter) has a great collection of photos too, along with poster artwork.
  • edited August 2008
    Fantastic, I tried to find The Normandie on wikipedia, but for some reason its not working; does anyone know the specifics on what happened when it was destroyed?
  • Wow, stunning! And quite a bit larger than the illustrious QM!
  • Fantastic, I tried to find The Normandie on wikipedia, but for some reason its not working; does anyone know the specifics on what happened when it was destroyed?
    Here it is.
    In 1942, while being converted to a troopship during World War II, Normandie caught fire, capsized, and sank at the New York Passenger Ship Terminal. Although she was salvaged at great expense, restoration was deemed too costly, and she was scrapped in October 1946.
  • What a tragedy. One of the most elegant an beautiful liners ever built.

    In the video, please note that the aft funnel was non-functional (used as a dog kennel). Also, there is a brief shot of the New York fireboat "Firefighter" that is still around. It was used to help fight the fires after the World Trade Center attack.

    http://www.themagazineantiques.com/news-opinion/current-and-coming/2010-02-18/art-deco-design-and-the-normandie/
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