Vintage Tobacco Ads

Under the title, Not a Cough in a Carload, Stanford University offers a wonderful collection of vintage tobacco ads!

moredoctorssmokecamels1hd3.jpg

Each ad comes with information about it, allowing an interesting glimpse at advertizing of the past!

Comments

  • Wow, that's fantastic. Using doctors to sell cigarettes - it's foolproof! Why these sorts of ads are no longer used is beyond me. On the rare occasion that I actually see an ad for cigarettes, it doesn't compel me to smoke at all.
  • I don't get compelled to smoke either, but that's mainly because I have respiratory problems and don't want to die a slow and painful death.

    I'm sure that at sme point in the future, some advertising buff will realise that this sort of ads is a good plan and reintroduce them.

    Actually, a friend told me and Bert a couple of weeks ago that his doctor had told him that "a cigarette once in a while was healthy" and that that is why he was a social smoker.
    Proves your case right there Colonel.
  • My, what timing for your friend to reveal evidence of the plot to use physicians to sell tobacco!

    ;)
  • Over here, there's barely ads for cigarettes at all. You don't see them on TV anymore, and hardly any billboards for tobacco... I think it's actually illegal, sort of.
  • I found some more on flickr :)

    here they are
  • Suffering from a serious allergy against tobacco smoke, these ads make me physically discomforted. I had stop looking at them.
  • Nowadays in the U.S. of A, children are inundated with anti-tobacco propaganda pretty much from birth. Of course, people still smoke, mostly because of the whole "Pandora's Box" reaction of doing something just because you're told not to. But either way, smoking is pretty much on the way out in America; the state in which I live just passed a statewide ban on smoking in workplaces. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, but ads like these do provide an interesting window into the past, especially where somewhat taboo subjects such as racism and smoking are concerned. They really help you see how far we've come in such a little time. Also, the using doctors to sell tobacco thing was a pretty common marketing strategy during the golden age of advertising. Either way, these ads have great vintage value to them.
  • I found some more on flickr :)

    here they are
    Cute!
    Mechanurg wrote:
    Suffering from a serious allergy against tobacco smoke, these ads make me physically discomforted. I had stop looking at them.
    Really? Does so much as looking at people smoking harm you?

    I'm all in favor of banning smoking from public spaces, because, like yourself, some people simply can't stand it. About a year ago though, all restaurants, cafes and hotels were forced to ban smoking in my country too. That, I believe, is taking matters one step too far. Proprietors should decide for themselves whether smoking is or is not allowed in their establishment.
  • Smoking's a curious one. On the one hand I dislike the idea, but then again, I think people should do as they please and if that means smoking then go for it. It not only may make you happy but it tells the anti-smoking interfering vigilantes where to go. Resturants and certain public places on the other hand should certainly dissallow them though.
    I sought to argue with a friend of mine on the subject. He's very anti-smoking.
    Myself, I tried to point out that it does have a certain retro charm: "James Dean, Humphry Bogart, Frank Sinatra, what have they all got in common?" (They were all stylish, smoked, and made smoking look stylish)
    My friend: "They're all dead"
  • Mechanurg wrote:
    Suffering from a serious allergy against tobacco smoke, these ads make me physically discomforted. I had stop looking at them.
    Really? Does so much as looking at people smoking harm you?
    Yes. It is a purely psychological reaction, of course. Unlike being exposed to real tobacco smoke, which triggers serious asthma and may require a trip to a hospital.
  • Mechanurg wrote:
    Yes. It is a purely psychological reaction, of course. Unlike being exposed to real tobacco smoke, which triggers serious asthma and may require a trip to a hospital.
    My, I'll be sure never to light a cigarette near you, sir!

    Your physical rejection of smoking is exactly why I think it's perfectly justified to ban it from public spaces, as city halls, libraries, museums, schools, etc.

    How do you feel about requiring shop- and restaurant keepers to ban smoking from their businesses though?
  • Ottens wrote:
    How do you feel about requiring shop- and restaurant keepers to ban smoking from their businesses though?
    A few years ago, Sweden banned smoking in indoor restaurants, cafés and bars. I was quite happy with that, because for the first time in many years (I developed asthma as an adult) wife and I could have a cozy dinner away from home and kids without these health worries. Before the ban, we used to frequent outdoor restaurants and cafés, but that would only be possible in summers, or places that also catered for children (McD and BurgerKing have always been tobacco-free here).

    The main reason for the ban was actually a health issue for restaurant staff. It turned out that a lot of young waiters developed bronchial problems because of passive smoking.
  • Mechanurg wrote:
    The main reason for the ban was actually a health issue for restaurant staff.
    That's the same reason smoking was banned from restaurants and cafes here last year.

    As much as I sympathize, I'm still not convinced that it's justified to decide for people whether they themselves and their customers can or cannot smoke in their businesses. Ideally, enough restaurant holders would ban smoking from their establishments so that there's plenty of choice for non-smokers as well.

    Of course, there's something to be said about the decency, or lack thereof, of smoking in the presence of others without asking for their permission.
Sign In or Register to comment.