Unexpected Steampunk Music: Pan de Capazo

Pan de Capazo
Pan de Capazo perform in Heist-op-den-Berg, Belgium, May 21 (Hilde Heyvaert)

There are these rare, very rare moments when you find yourself sitting at a local festival that couldn’t be further away from anything steampunk or dieselpunk if it tried and you realizes that the band that just started to perform on stage is, in fact… a steampunk band.

That was what happened when I attended the annual Heist-op-den-Berg sheep-shearing festival in Belgium on May 21. (I go for the food, the food is amazing) Continue reading “Unexpected Steampunk Music: Pan de Capazo”

The Mother Matrix

The Mother Matrix
The Mother Matrix

Stand back everyone, I’m going to try… SCIENCE!

Thus starts “The Spark”, the most energetic song on The Mother Matrix, the newest brain child of the Nathaniel Johnstone Band.

And boy, what a brain child it is! Undoubtedly his best album to date, it combines genres from the past with the kind of music he has become best known for, making this a hotpot of genres and yet every song still has that signature Johnstone feel to it. Continue reading “The Mother Matrix”

Swamp Steam

Swamp Steam
Swamp Steam

Sousaphones, bagpipes, valve trombone and ukulele, oh my!

These are some of the extraordinary and unusual (for steampunk at least) instruments you can find on Swamp Steam and let me tell you right now, if this is what comes out of the swamp then sign me right up for a visit!

It may all seem strange at first glance, but it’s a musical gumbo that not only works, it leaves you constantly wondering, wanting to move to the groove and wanting more. It’s the kind of CD to listen to when the fancy for a good mix of different genres strikes or simply to play in the background. Both work and that in itself is quite unique. Continue reading “Swamp Steam”

Rinrei

Rinrei
Rinrei

First a little background: In Japan (there are exceptions, such as Tokyo-based steampunk band Strange Artifact), much like is the case with visual kei, steampunk music compiles a wide variety of genres, unified almost solely by their look.

Unlike Western steampunk bands, they don’t have a set gimmick and steampunk lyrics, but use their look to set themselves as part of the movement while playing their own particular musical genre.

One of those artists is Eri Kitamura, the most recent Japanese artist to have discovered steampunk. Continue reading “Rinrei”

Bookends Fall

Bookends Fall
Bookends Fall

Jody Ellen, previously of Abney Park fame, returns with a new album, Bookends Fall.

Following on the excellent Skyscrapers and Helicopters (read our review here), Ellen proves that she can handle more genres and is an excellent vocalist and song smith in her own right. If you liked her in Abney Park, and you like singer-songwriter-type songs and soulful singing, you should check out her new work. Continue reading “Bookends Fall”

The Antikythera Mechanism

The Antikythera Mechanism
The Antikythera Mechanism

Nathaniel Johnstone and his band return for more excellent storytelling of both steampunk and mythologically influenced persuasion with their latest full album, The Antikythera Mechanism.

The all-new, fourteen-song full album contains musical journeys with tentacled friends, stories of yore and wonder and tales of heroes and villains from mythology. Each music to sing along to and dance to your heart’s content or simply to enjoy listening to in your favorite place(s). Continue reading “The Antikythera Mechanism”

Skeleton Coast

Skeleton Coast
Skeleton Coast

Ghostfire is one of my two favorite Steampunk bands, along with Victor Sierra, so I was eagerly awaiting their next release after The Tydburn Jig.

Strictly speaking, Skeleton Coast is not steampunk. As you can guess from the title, it is pirate-themed. This did not dim my enjoyment of the EP in the slightest. Skeleton Coast delivers four very atmospheric songs, ranging in style from shanties, “Fire In The Hole”, to classic Ghostfire style like we have heard on The Tydburn Jig, “Griminsky’s Soul”. Continue reading “Skeleton Coast”