Steampunk

Punk Is Dead. Long Live Steampunk!

I didn’t get into steampunk to be an activist.

What got me hooked was The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen in 2003, then discovering it was based on a graphic novel (which was even better), and then discovering that there was an entire genre of this stuff.

I was already into nineteenth-century history and I was into science-fiction. Putting those two together was brilliant. Continue reading “Punk Is Dead. Long Live Steampunk!”

Lady Mechanika, Volume 3: The Lost Boys of West Abbey

Lady Mechanika, Volume 3
Lady Mechanika, Volume 3

In this fourth (third according to publication chronology, but fourth in the storyline) bundled storyline of steampunk favorite Lady Mechanika, we find our hero investigating the death of a couple of street urchins in a seedy part of town. Aided by genius engeneer Mr Lewis, his niece Fred, two recurring characters, and dashing young police inspector Singh, a new addition to the cast. Continue reading “Lady Mechanika, Volume 3: The Lost Boys of West Abbey”

The Frankenstein Chronicles, Season 1

The Frankenstein Chronicles
The Frankenstein Chronicles

Netflix has brought us another beautiful example of SteamGoth TV: The Frankenstein Chronicles, a British series which started in 2015 on ITV and was continued last year for a second season. Some areas already have season 2 available on Netflix as well, but we’re still waiting for that where I am. So I shall limit my review to season 1.

The show opens in London, on the River Thames, where we meet inspector John Marlott from the river police at his job. A grisly discovery on the riverbank brings an investigation into both the high society and underbelly of London to discover who is playing God, much like in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and to find a missing child in the process. Continue reading “The Frankenstein Chronicles, Season 1”

Faisal I of Iraq

Changing My Mind About Victorientalism

This website, then known as The Gatehouse, gained some notoriety in 2010, when we dedicated an issue of our webzine, the Gatehouse Gazette, to “Victorientalism”.

I subsequently defended this choice in a blog post that now strikes me as insensitive and in some places wrong.

My assumption — that it is safe to recreate stereotypes from colonial times because those stereotypes, and the power imbalances they sustained, have gone — was flawed. I have learned that such stereotypes and power imbalances are in some cases still with us and in others have a lingering effect. I should have listened to the people (of color) who tried to tell me that eight years ago. Continue reading “Changing My Mind About Victorientalism”

Oceania

Cinquantenaire Museum Belgium Oceania exhibit
Oceania exhibit at the Cinquantenaire Museum, Belgium, January 21 (Hilde Heyveart)

Exhibitions at the Cinquantenaire Museum have a lot of live up to. While it is one of the least known museums in Belgium, and often gives the impression of being grossly underfunded (most general admission halls don’t even have heating in winter, be warned), it generally puts up exhibitions that can easily rival with those in big museums of international renown, such as the British Museum.

This time they teamed up with the Museum for Middle Africa, which means they had access to more pieces than just their own collection.

So was Oceania on that same level? Stick with this review and find out! Continue reading “Oceania”

Lady Mechanika, Volume 2: The Tablet of Destinies

Lady Mechanika, Volume 2
Lady Mechanika, Volume 2

In the second volume of Lady Mechanika, we learn more about our partly-mechanical heroine and the world she lives in.

When a dear friend of Mechanika finds himself in peril across the globe, she sets off to his aid with both new and old friends, leaving her home town to traverse deserts and jungles. Only to encounter a fan-favorite enemy of the dieselpunk genre, out to get the fabled tablet of destinies. Continue reading “Lady Mechanika, Volume 2: The Tablet of Destinies”

Tokyo Disney Sea Japan

Steampunk in Tokyo Disney Sea

Many a steampunk is familiar with the sights of not only Nautilus in Tokyo Disney Sea, but the entire scenery of Mysterious Island. While many Disney parks have a castle at the center of the park, Mysterious Island boasts Mount Prometheus of Mysterious Island. Literally, but I’ll get to that in a bit.

Is this all there is that makes Tokyo Disney Sea so worth it for ‘punks? Or is there more to the park than meets the initial eye? Continue reading “Steampunk in Tokyo Disney Sea”