The Doomsday Vault

The Doomsday Vault
The Doomsday Vault

The Doomsday Vault by Steven Harper is a recent addition to the ever-growing library of steampunk novels. And a very worthy one at that.

The times are Victorian and we find ourselves in a London ruled by Victoria and her Albert. The clockwork plague has swept the world, turning people into zombies left and right or worse: mad geniuses known as clockworkers.

Against this background, the tales of our heroes unfold. Continue reading “The Doomsday Vault”

North Atlantic map

A Rupture Between Continents?

European steampunk counts fewer numbers than their North American (and mainly US) counterparts. I’m pretty sure that if you would add up all the numbers in the entirety of Europe, you would get about the same as those for the United States alone (the US probably has more numbers than the entirety of Europe, come to think of it).

Originally there was a unison worldwide. Steampunks everywhere where in it for the same reason. If you spoke to steampunks from other continents, the same topics arose and likeminded individuals were easily found, no matter what country they hailed from.

Thankfully this is still the case, but sadly less and less so when one starts comparing some — frankly disturbing — recent developments in the movement in both aforementioned continents. Continue reading “A Rupture Between Continents?”

Occupy Wall Street

Occupy, Steampunk Go Hand in Hand?

SteamPunk Magazine is planning a number of articles about the “Occupy” movement in its upcoming, eighth edition, which is something I’m looking forward to. I’m not a fan of “Occupy” but curious how they’ll make the case that it’s relevant to steampunk.

At the risk of speaking before my turn, some of the comments to the announcement that “Occupy” would be part of the new SteamPunk Magazine worry me.

Writes Ladd, “The occupy movement and steampunk do seem to go hand in hand.”

Really? Continue reading “Occupy, Steampunk Go Hand in Hand?”

Justin Bieber

The Specter of Elitism

Recently, an image of Justin Bieber wearing a steampunk glove or gauntlet was going around on the ætherweb.

There have been a wide range of reactions regarding the photograph. Many have voiced their disappointment or even disgust of steampuk going mainstream and someone like Justin Bieber using steampunk paraphernalia. Several commenters on Facebook and a number of forums and blogs have even declared steampunk to be dead because of it.

Well, excuse me, but could somebody please explain to me how Justin Bieber’s use of a steampunk glove and other apparel can spell the doom of a global subculture? Continue reading “The Specter of Elitism”

The Bride Wore Black Leather

The Bridge Wore Black Leather
The Bridge Wore Black Leather

The much anticipated final installment of Simon R. Green’s celebrated Nightside series is nearly upon us (the official release date is January 3, 2012) and let me start by assuring you that everything he said in his interview in Gatehouse Gazette #21 is true.

Let me first state that this review will contain no spoilers. I don’t want to ruin the experience for those that have to wait for the official release date, as that would be very unfair of me. Continue reading “The Bride Wore Black Leather”

Brass Goggles

Tinkergirl Talks About Creating Brass Goggles

Back in the summer of 2009, I exchanged several messages with the creator of Brass Goggles in hopes of completing a full interview for publication in the Gatehouse Gazette. Unfortunately, after emailing back and forth a few times, I didn’t hear back from her anymore, but I would like to share with you these tidbits of Brass Goggles history. Continue reading “Tinkergirl Talks About Creating Brass Goggles”

Steampunk Is Not a Subculture — Yet

Not a long time ago, Nick wrote that steampunk means different things in different places. He talked about how in Europe, it is a kind of aesthetics while in other places, including the United States, it looks more like a cultural movement.

Because there are so many differences between people who enjoy the steampunk aesthetic, Nick suggested that it’s hard to call steampunk a subculture. Rather it should be understood as an aesthetic that’s applied in different ways. But it’s not just a matter of preference. When a lot of people around the world realize that they share appreciation of an art style or a genre or an interest in reviewing the possible political implications of the steampunk ethos, we are talking about a community that’s organized around a particular theme. While some marvel in the aesthetic, others are attracted to steampunk for another reason.

What we’re really talking about then is a movement. Continue reading “Steampunk Is Not a Subculture — Yet”