The Rocketeer at War

The Rocketeer at War
The Rocketeer at War

This volume bundles together the first four single issues in the ongoing The Rocketeer at War storyline. It is actually the first to be released as a trade paperback, the previous ones, with exception of the short-story book Jet-Pack Adventures, have always been hardcover.

What is great about this issue is that they have kept the same writers and used only two different artists. Which is a vast improvement on past storylines and really helps with consistency. Continue reading “The Rocketeer at War”

The Man in the High Castle map

The World of The Man in the High Castle

Last year, we featured a map of North America from the title credits of Amazon’s The Man in the High Castle, which shows the United States divided into German and Japanese zones.

The second season of the series, which is also based on Philip K. Dick’s 1963 alternate-history novel and started streaming in December, gives us a fuller picture of the world. Continue reading “The World of The Man in the High Castle”

Berlin Germany skyline

Hitler’s Nightmare Capital of the World

When you look at the projects that the Nazi government tackled, you cannot rid yourself of the feeling that they had a grandiosity fetish.

To put it in more direct terms: Megalomania was an intrinsic feature of the system. World domination, tank-battleships like the Landkreuzer Ratte and the drastic redesign of Berlin into the capital of the world — Germania. Continue reading “Hitler’s Nightmare Capital of the World”

Nazi whale swallows Britain

How the Nazis Planned to Invade Great Britain

After Germany had overrun France and the Low Countries in the spring of 1940, an invasion of Britain — then the only nation still free in Europe — seemed like a distinct possibility. German fighter planes and bombers waged a months-long air war with their British counterparts over the Channel and the south of England in the summer of that year. The Germans meant to follow up with an amphibious assault once the Luftwaffe had established air superiority.

Of course, the Germans never managed. Prime Minister Winston Churchill congratulated Britain’s airmen in August, saying they had “unwearied in their constant challenge and mortal danger” and were “turning the tide of the world war by their prowess and by their devotion.”

“Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few,” he said.

The British had been outnumbered and outgunned yet managed to fend off the Nazi air assault and give Adolf Hitler his first defeat.

Even if they’d failed, though, it is doubtful that a German invasion of Great Britain would have succeeded. Continue reading “How the Nazis Planned to Invade Great Britain”