The Frankenstein Chronicles, Season 1

The Frankenstein Chronicles
The Frankenstein Chronicles

Netflix has brought us another beautiful example of SteamGoth TV: The Frankenstein Chronicles, a British series which started in 2015 on ITV and was continued last year for a second season. Some areas already have season 2 available on Netflix as well, but we’re still waiting for that where I am. So I shall limit my review to season 1.

The show opens in London, on the River Thames, where we meet inspector John Marlott from the river police at his job. A grisly discovery on the riverbank brings an investigation into both the high society and underbelly of London to discover who is playing God, much like in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and to find a missing child in the process. Continue reading “The Frankenstein Chronicles, Season 1”

Hindenburg airship over New York

Never Was: A New Beginning for an Old Steampunk Site

The Gatehouse first came online almost ten years ago, in 2008. A lot has changed in the steam- and dieselpunk scene since then. The former has arguably gone mainstream. The latter is now recognized as a genre and a subculture in its own right. We have seen blogs and webzines come and go. The Gatehouse itself underwent many changes (read our history here). Now it’s time for the next chapter.

With a new name and a new domain, we are upping our game. Continuing in the tradition of The Gatehouse, Never Was will be more of a magazine than a blog, with long-form stories about architecture, history and genre theory as well as the event, book and movie reviews you have come to expect of us. Continue reading “Never Was: A New Beginning for an Old Steampunk Site”

Faisal I of Iraq

Changing My Mind About Victorientalism

This website, then known as The Gatehouse, gained some notoriety in 2010, when we dedicated an issue of our webzine, the Gatehouse Gazette, to “Victorientalism”.

I subsequently defended this choice in a blog post that now strikes me as insensitive and in some places wrong.

My assumption — that it is safe to recreate stereotypes from colonial times because those stereotypes, and the power imbalances they preserved, have gone — was flawed. I have learned that such stereotypes and power imbalances are in some cases still with us and in others have a lingering effect. I should have listened to the people (of color) who tried to tell me that eight years ago. Continue reading “Changing My Mind About Victorientalism”