Nazi moon artwork by Rainyempire

Nazis on the Moon

Dieselpunk fans will be familiar with the 2012 movie Iron Sky, which shows how a group of Nazis fled to the Moon after Hitler’s defeat in 1945 and return to Earth with UFOs and huge zeppelin-like spaceship.

Not all might be aware that the fantasy of a German Moon base precedes this hilarious film.

Nazi moon artwork by Waldemar Kazak
Art by Waldemar Kazak

The theory is only slightly more outlandish than that of the Nazi base in Antarctica.

Best we can tell, it started with a Bulgarian engineer named Vladimir Terziski, who bills himself as the president of an “American Academy of Dissident Sciences.”

Terziski claims that, with their advanced rocket technology, the Nazis were able to launch a Moon mission in the early 1940s. They were able to set up shop there because, contrary what you were told in school, the Moon has a comfortable atmosphere that makes vegetation possible. No spacesuits required!

The American 1969 Moon landing was, of course, staged to prevent the rest of the world from finding out the truth. John F. Kennedy’s assassination inevitably gets tied up in this.

Terziski couldn’t explain, though, why these Space-Nazis, with all their secret technology and gear, still lost the war at home. But he tells a nice story:

Ever since their first day of landing on the Moon, the Germans started boring and tunneling under the surface and by the end of the war there was a small Nazi research base on the Moon. The free-energy tachyon drive craft of the Haunibu-1 and 2 type were used after 1944 to haul people, materiel and the first robots to the construction site on the Moon. When Russians and Americans secretly landed jointly on the Moon in the early fifties with their own saucers, they spent their first night there as guests of the … Nazi underground base. In the sixties, a massive Russian-American base had been built on the Moon that now has a population of 40,000 people, as the rumor goes.

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